RSD9 Workshops

16 workshops, hosted online from Belgium, Canada, Colombia, France, India, Italy, Netherlands, Norway, Thailand, UK, and USA.

Circularity as Unifying Concept in Systemic Design for Sustainability?

WORKSHOP: Sunday, October 11, 2020 | 7:00 PM IST. Tobias Luthe, Angel Lamar, Birger Sevaldson, Tine Hegli, Marianne Storen Berg, and Peter Hemmersam, The Oslo School of Architecture and Design

Futures Design, Language and Systems – Towards languaging pluriversal futures

WORKSHOP: Friday, October 9, 2020 | 5:00 PM IST. Facilitators: Palak Dudani and Andrew Morrison, Oslo School of Architecture and Design

Mapping the Political Economy of Design

WORKSHOP: Friday, October 9, 2020 | 7:00 PM IST. Facilitators: Joanna Boehnert and Simon Downs, Loughborough University

Power Tools for Collaborative Modelling of Socioeco-Sustainment

WORKSHOP: Friday, October 9, 2020 | 7:00 PM IST. Facilitators: Nicole Norris, Maya Hoveskog, Francesca Ostuzzi, Peter Jones, and Antony Upward

Virtual-Real MOOCS: Designing Resilient Regenerative Systems

WORKSHOP: Friday, October 9, 2020 | 5:00 PM IST. Facilitators: Tobias Luthe, Birger Sevaldson, Silvia Barbero, Mieke van der Bijl-Brouwer and Justyna Swat

Practicing the Worlds We Want: Prefigurative design for revolutionary transformation

WORKSHOP: Saturday, October 10, 2020 | 7:30 PM IST. Facilitators: Ariana Lutterman & Tara Campbell from Superorganism

Hearth, Home and Well-being

WORKSHOP: Saturday, October 10, 2020 | 7:00 PM IST. Facilitators: Sucharita Beniwal & Swagata Naidu, National Institute of Design

The Hippie Movement Discussed as Systemic Change

WORKSHOP: Saturday, October 10, 2020 | 5:00 PM IST. Facilitator: Birger Sevaldson, Oslo School of Design

Leveraging Tensions in Systemic Design

WORKSHOP: Saturday, October 10, 2020 | 5:00 PM IST. Facilitators: Mieke van der Bijl-Brouwer, Jan-Carel Diehl, Ella Jamsin, Jotte de Koning, Rebecca Price and Nynke Tromp, Delft University of Technology

Bringing Systemic Design to Communities with the Circular Design Lab

WORKSHOP: Tuesday, October 13, 2020 | 5:30 AM IST. Facilitators: Chris Oestereich & Courtney Savie Lawrence, Circular Design Lab

Introducing and Testing a Systemic Design Practice Framework

WORKSHOP: Wednesday, October 14, 2020 | 5:30 am IST/10:00 AM AEST. Facilitator: Emma Blomkamp. Limited to 25 participants

Reordering our Priorities through Systems Change Learning

WORKSHOP: Thursday, October 15, 2020 | 5:30 AM IST. Facilitators: Zaid Khan, David Ing, Dan Eng, Kelly Okamuara, and Zemina Meghji

Control vs. Care: Frameworks for Systems Redesign During COVID-19

WORKSHOP: Saturday, October 17, 2020 | 5:30 AM IST. Facilitators: Jonathan Healey and Sydney M. Luken

Intervening in Power Dynamics: Introducing a new tool for talking about, analyzing, and shifting power

WORKSHOP: Saturday, October 17, 2020 | 8:00 PM IST/9:30 AM CST. Facilitators: Lyndon Valicenti and Rae Perez, Daylight

Kogui’s Systemic Thinking for Sustainable Design of Habitats in Colombia and Worldwide

WORKSHOP: Saturday, October 17, 2020 | 5:00 PM IST. Facilitators: Eduardo Mazuera & Laura Niño Caceres.

What Does Belonging Mean? A framing and network approach to tackle loneliness among students

WORKSHOP: Saturday, October 17, 2020 | 7:00 PM IST. Facilitators: Eva Legemaate, Marie Van den Bergh, and Mieke van der Bijl-Brouwer, Delft University of Technology. Maximum of 15 participants

The Hippie Movement Discussed as Systemic Change

Birger and Tone ploughing with horse in 1970

Saturday, October 10, 2020 | 5:00 PM IST

Facilitator: Birger Sevaldson, Oslo School of Design
Country: Norway
2-hour online workshop

There is no doubt that the Hippie movement changed western societies dramatically. For us who experienced the change, it was a personal fight for liberation as well as a cultural change of atmosphere in society.

This is a suggestion for a discussion and not an attempt to provide answers. In any case, the Hippie movement induced cultural change through the use of symbols and signals (clothing, hairstyle, music) the denial of the establishment to induce a softer kinder society (make love, not war) and counter-cultural action (the use of drugs and protests) and Rejection of established reality (anti-science, alternative ways of growing food, mystical practices, embracement of eastern philosophies and practices like meditation).

At its best, the movement became home to many displaced and miss-fitted individuals and it crossed religions, race gender and social backgrounds.

Despite its impact on western society there where many moves that did eventually destroy the movement. One issue is that it became so saturated that it was embraced by the system it tried to replace. Another thing was that the initially soft and experience focussed drug experiments were replaced by cynical mafias with hard drugs especially amphetamine that flushed the alternative movement.

It is obvious that there were many forces at play. I intend to initiate the discussion over three steps:

1) A short presentation of the issue
2) A short discussion bringing up sources and themes
3) A short gigamapping session starting to mapping out the forces at play.

It is my intention to collect this and compile it into systemic analyses of the hippie movement. This seems important now when western society is shaking and all kind of undemocratic and aggressive forces are at play. We need to better understand how bottom-up change can happen. The use of cultural expression was crucial in the Hippie movement and is probably underrated in our systemic approaches today.